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Hi

In terms of a oscilloscope for instance you can calculate what the time per division (time/div) is for the y-axis and the volts per division for the x-axis. This changes when you zoom in and out.

My question is how can I calculate these in the simplest way possible to calculate the volts per division according to the current zoom level?
You will obviously have inputs of the start frequency and amplitude when the application start or whenever these inputs changes on the units side.
But when you zoom in and out depending on whether you are zooming the y-axis or x-axis or both the time / div and volts / div needs to be calculated.

Thanks a lot Gert

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From your question I’m guessing you need to know what is the Volts per Division that SciChart calculates? If so then you need to look at the AxisBase.MajorDelta and AxisBase.MajorDelta.MajorDelta property. These are computed by ScIChart every time the chart draws. For instance, you could subscribe to AxisBase.VisibleRangeChanged and read these values out.

What are Axis Ticks and Deltas?

The MajorDelta and MinorDelta are properties on the axis which define the delta, or difference between Major and Minor ticks. By default,
the MajorDelta, MinorDelta (therefore the Tick spacing) are calculated
automatically when AxisBase.AutoTicks = true.

If, however, you need to set the Volts per division, then please see this article on Altering the Tick Frequency with AutoTicks.

Manual Tick Frequency

The next mode of operation is to manually define the tick spacing. To disable automatic MajorDelta and MinorDelta calculation you should set
AutoTicks = false. In this mode, SciChart requires that the developer
sets the AxisBase.MajorDelta and AxisBase.MinorDelta, which will
define how many tick intervals are calculated.

Best regards,

Andrew

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